Homosexuality: Identity and/or Behavior?

Wesley Hill writes about why addressing the homosexuality and same-sex morality is acutely challenging today, which is wrapped up in identity and behavior:

After spelling out a number of other moral issues with which Christians must grapple, e.g. divorce, Hill writes,

Why aren’t these kinds of moral commands and decisions treated with the same level of dismay that Christianity’s judgment about gay sex is?

Here’s the key, I think: It’s because gay and lesbian people perceive Christianity as not just asking for a certain modification or a certain disciplining of their behavior but rather for a suppression or erasure of their identities.

One of the ways this influences Hill is in nomenclature. He continues to refer to himself as a gay Christian. I am not yet convinced it is a good move, but I am willing to consider this further in light of my understanding of biblical anthropology, hamartiology and soteriology.

This is the assessment of Michael Schulman, “Generational ‘LGBTQIA’,” StarTribune (January 19, 2013), E.4-5, who writes: “Those who feel they don’t identify with traditional gender roles are creating their own.” Here is the main point of that article, which reflects Hill’s assessment above: “If the gay-rights movement today seems to revolve around same-sex marriage, this generation is seeking something more radical: an upending of gender roles beyond the binary of male/female. The core question is not whom they love, but who they are – that is, identity as distinct from sexual orientation.”

I think making sexual orientation the core of one’s identity is a significant misstep, a step away from the Scripture’s teaching. One’s sex – male and female – is part of what it means to be created in the image of God (Gen. 1:26-27), but that is quite different than gender (which is considered a social construct) and orientation (which is affected by the fall).

I have learned much from Hill, have much respect for him, and continue to hear, ponder and reflect upon what he writes. Though he does not necessarily agree with the statement made above, i.e. it is more a descriptive assessment than a prescriptive pronouncement, my sense is that making the heart of this one’s identity, and not just or primarily behavioral, continues to cloud and confuse the issue. But I also believe it is important to hear this because it is how others hear Christians!

Email Updates

Subscribe to receive EFCA blog updates.

* indicates required